Christian Professor From Iowa College Says Jesus was a Muslim

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Epigraph: “Say ye: ‘We believe in Allah and what has been revealed to us, and what was revealed to Abraham and Ishmael, and Isaac, and Jacob and his children, and what was given to Moses and Jesus, and what was given to all other Prophets from their Lord. We make no difference between any of them; and to Him we submit ourselves.’” (Al Quran 2:137)

Exterior of the Church of the Holy Sepulcher: One of the Holiest places in Christianity

Do Muslims understand Jesus in some ways more historically appropriate than Christians do?

Source: WND Education

A professor at an Iowa college says as a Christian, he has to say that Jesus was a Muslim.

Ignoring the historical timeline in which Jesus taught some 2,000 years ago in the Middle East and the advent of Islam is dated six centuries later, after Christianity had impacted much of the known globe, Robert F. Shedinger, who wrote “Was Jesus a Muslim?” said his research convinced him of Jesus as aligning in thought with Islam.

 In a video report that was uncovered by CampusReform.org, the professor is interviewed by In The Community television in Raleigh, N.C.,

Shedinger said the issue arose when a Muslim student challenged his teaching about Islam, and he rethought not only Islam, but all of religion.

He came to perceive Islam as a social justice system instead of a religion, and found that he thought the same about Jesus.

Robert F. Shedinger

“I had to rethink what Islam is,” Shedinger said in the interview. “I came to the conclusion that it was a social justice movement and I think that’s who Jesus was in the first century so I conclude Jesus is more like a Muslim.”

He admitted it would “be a stretch” for many to follow his process and consider Jesus a Muslim, but, “It doesn’t make me uncomfortable any more.”

“Even as a Christian I have to answer yes to that,” he said

“We’re not trying to aggravate nobody,” said the interviewer, Abdush Shahid Munir.

Noting that his audience included Christians, Muslims “and other denominations,” Munir asked Shedinger to explain this book.

Shedinger said he re-evaluated a lot of the research he’d encountered during his training, and he suddenly recognized “there were a lot of scholars out there who are arguing the points I make in the book.”

He described his book as a “call for Christians and Muslims to work together to promote social justice.”

His book is published by Fortress Press, the academic book imprint of Augsburg Fortress, which “is noted for its significant publishing in the areas of religious studies, Jewish-Christian studies, African American religion, religion and science, feminist theology, and ethics.”

“The Fortress Press is academic, ecumenical, inclusive, and international,” the company explains.

The college lists Shedinger as associate professor of religion, and cites his course teachings as Intro to the Hebrew Bible, The Bible and Imperial Politics, Intro to Islam, Life After 9/11, Unity and Diversity in Contemporary Islam, and Biodiversity.

Read more and watch a video interview in WND Education

Introduction to the Book in Amazon

An intriguing question — Do Muslims understand Jesus in some ways more historically appropriate than Christians do? leads Robert F. Shedinger into a series of provocative challenges to the disciplines of religious studies and comparative religions. Questioning the convenient distinction between “politics” and “religion” and the isolation of “religion” from wider social and cultural questions, Shedinger offers a proposal for a more accurate and respectful understanding of faith that he argues will improve possibilities for mutual understanding among Christians, Muslims — and others.

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